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If you are preparing for a career in IT or are new to IT, many of the “dirty little secrets” listed below may surprise you because we don’t usually talk about them out loud. If you are an IT veteran, you’ve probably encountered most of these issues and have a few of your own to add — and please, by all means, take a moment to add them to the discussion. Most of these secrets are aimed at network administrators, IT managers, and desktop support professionals. This list is not aimed at developers and programmers — they have their own set of additional dirty little secrets — but some of these will apply to them as well.

10.) The pay in IT is good compared to many other professions, but since they pay you well, they often think they own you

Although the pay for IT professionals is not as great as it was before the dot-com flameout and the IT backlash in 2001-2002, IT workers still make very good money compared to many other professions (at least the ones that require only an associate’s or bachelor’s degree). And there is every reason to believe that IT pros will continue to be in demand in the coming decades, as technology continues to play a growing role in business and society. However, because IT professionals can be so expensive, some companies treat IT pros like they own them. If you have to answer a tech call at 9:00 PM because someone is working late, you hear, “That’s just part of the job.” If you need to work six hours on a Saturday to deploy a software update to avoid downtime during business hours, you get, “There’s no comp time for that since you’re on salary. That’s why we pay you the big bucks!”

9.) It will be your fault when users make silly errors

Some users will angrily snap at you when they are frustrated. They will yell, “What’s wrong with this thing?” or “This computer is NOT working!” or (my personal favorite), “What did you do to the computers?” In fact, the problem is that they accidentally deleted the Internet Explorer icon from the desktop, or unplugged the mouse from the back of the computer with their foot, or spilled their coffee on the keyboard.

8.) You will go from goat to hero and back again multiple times within any given day

When you miraculously fix something that had been keeping multiple employees from being able to work for the past 10 minutes — and they don’t realize how simple the fix really was — you will become the hero of the moment and everyone’s favorite employee. But they will conveniently forget about your hero anointment a few hours later when they have trouble printing because of a network slowdown — you will be enemy No. 1 at that moment. But if you show users a handy little Microsoft Outlook trick before the end of the day, you’ll soon return to hero status.

7.) Certifications won’t always help you become a better technologist, but they can help you land a better job or a pay raise

Headhunters and human resources departments love IT certifications. They make it easy to match up job candidates with job openings. They also make it easy for HR to screen candidates. You’ll hear a lot of veteran IT pros whine about techies who were hired based on certifications but who don’t have the experience to effectively do the job. They are often right. That has happened in plenty of places. But the fact is that certifications open up your career options. They show that you are organized and ambitious and have a desire to educate yourself and expand your skills. If you are an experienced IT pro and have certifications to match your experience, you will find yourself to be extremely marketable. Tech certifications are simply a way to prove your baseline knowledge and to market yourself as a professional. However, most of them are not a good indicator of how good you will be at the job.

6.) Your nontechnical co-workers will use you as personal tech support for their home PCs

Your co-workers (in addition to your friends, family, and neighbors) will view you as their personal tech support department for their home PCs and home networks. They will e-mail you, call you, and/or stop by your office to talk about how to deal with the virus that took over their home PC or the wireless router that stopped working after the last power outage and to ask you how to put their photos and videos on the Web so their grandparents in Iowa can view them. Some of them might even ask you if they can bring their home PC to the office for you to fix it. The polite ones will offer to pay you, but some of them will just hope or expect you can help them for free. Helping these folks can be very rewarding, but you have to be careful about where to draw the line and know when to decline.

5.) Vendors and consultants will take all the credit when things work well and will blame you when things go wrong

Working with IT consultants is an important part of the job and can be one of the more challenging things to manage. Consultants bring niche expertise to help you deploy specialized systems, and when everything works right, it’s a great partnership. But you have to be careful. When things go wrong, some consultants will try to push the blame off on you by arguing that their solution works great everywhere else so it must be a problem with the local IT infrastructure. Conversely, when a project is wildly successful, there are consultants who will try to take all of the credit and ignore the substantial work you did to customize and implement the solution for your company.

4.) You’ll spend far more time babysitting old technologies than implementing new ones

One of the most attractive things about working in IT is the idea that we’ll get to play with the latest cutting edge technologies. However, that’s not usually the case in most IT jobs. The truth is that IT professionals typically spend far more time maintaining, babysitting, and nursing established technologies than implementing new ones. Even IT consultants, who work with more of the latest and greatest technologies, still tend to work primarily with established, proven solutions rather than the real cutting edge stuff.

3.) Veteran IT professionals are often the biggest roadblock to implementing new technologies

A lot of companies could implement more cutting edge stuff than they do. There are plenty of times when upgrading or replacing software or infrastructure can potentially save money and/or increase productivity and profitability. However, it’s often the case that one of the largest roadblocks to migrating to new technologies is not budget constraints or management objections; it’s the veteran techies in the IT department. Once they have something up and running, they are reluctant to change it. This can be a good thing because their jobs depend on keeping the infrastructure stable, but they also use that as an excuse to not spend the time to learn new things or stretch themselves in new directions. They get lazy, complacent, and self-satisfied.

2.) Some IT professionals deploy technologies that do more to consolidate their own power than to help the business

Another subtle but blameworthy thing that some IT professionals do is select and implement technologies based on how well those technologies make the business dependent on the IT pros to run them, rather than which ones are truly best for the business itself. For example, IT pros might select a solution that requires specialized skills to maintain instead of a more turnkey solution. Or an IT manager might have more of a Linux/UNIX background and so chooses a Linux-based solution over a Windows solution, even though the Windows solution is a better business decision (or, vice versa, a Windows admin might bypass a Linux-based appliance, for example). There are often excuses and justifications given for this type of behavior, but most of them are disingenuous.

1.) IT pros frequently use jargon to confuse nontechnical business managers and hide the fact that they screwed up

All IT pros — even the very best — screw things up once in a while. This is a profession where a lot is at stake and the systems that are being managed are complex and often difficult to integrate. However, not all IT pros are good at admitting when they make a mistake. Many of them take advantage of the fact that business managers (and even some high-level technical managers) don’t have a good understanding of technology, and so the techies will use jargon to confuse them (and cover up the truth) when explaining why a problem or an outage occurred. For example, to tell a business manager why a financial application went down for three hours, the techie might say, “We had a blue screen of death on the SQL Server that runs that app. Damn Microsoft!” What the techie would fail to mention was that the BSOD was caused by a driver update he applied to the server without first testing it on a staging machine.

One day I decided to quit…
I quit my job, my relationship, my spirituality… I wanted to quit my life.
I went to the woods to have one last talk with God.
“God”, I said. “Can you give me one good reason not to quit?”
His answer surprised me…
“Look around”, He said. “Do you see the fern and the bamboo?”
“Yes”, I replied.
When I planted the fern and the bamboo seeds, I took very good care of them.
I gave them light. I gave them water.
The fern quickly grew from the earth.
Its brilliant green covered the floor.
Yet nothing came from the bamboo seed.
But I did not quit on the bamboo.
In the second year the Fern grew more vibrant and plentiful.
And again, nothing came from the bamboo seed.
But I did not quit on the bamboo. He said.
“In the third year, there was still nothing from the bamboo seed. But I would not quit. In the fourth year, again, there was nothing from the bamboo seed. “I would not quit.” He said. “Then in the fifth year a tiny sprout emerged from the earth.

Compared to the fern it was seemingly small and insignificant… But just 6 months later the bamboo rose to over 100 feet tall.

It had spent the five years growing roots.

Those roots made it strong and gave it what it needed to survive. I would not give any of my creations a challenge it could not handle.”

He said to me. “Did you know, my child, that all this time you have been struggling, you have actually been growing roots.”

“I would not quit on the bamboo. I will never quit on you. ” Don’t compare yourself to others ..” He said. ” The bamboo had a different purpose than the fern … Yet, they both make the forest beautiful.”

Your time will come, ” God said to me. ” You will rise high! ” How high should I rise?” I asked.

How high will the bamboo rise?” He asked in return.

“As high as it can? ” I questioned.

” Yes. ” He said, “Give me glory by rising as high as you can. ”

I left the forest and bring back this story.

I hope these words can help you see that God will never give up on you.

He will never give up on you.

Never regret a day in your life.

Good days give you happiness

Bad days give you experiences;

Both are essential to life.

A happy and meaningful life requires our continuous input and creativity. It does not happen by chance. It happens because of our choices and actions. And each day we are given new opportunities to choose and act and, in doing so, we create our own unique journey.” Keep going…

Happiness keeps you Sweet,
Trials keep you Strong, Sorrows keep you Human,
Failures keep you humble,

Success keeps You Glowing,

but Only God keeps You Going!

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Rank  ↓ Nation  ↓ Gold  ↓ Silver  ↓ Bronze  ↓ Total  ↓
1 China China (CHN) 51 21 28 100
2 United States United States (USA) 36 38 36 110
3 Russia Russia (RUS) 23 21 28 72
4 Great Britain Great Britain (GBR) 19 13 15 47
5 Germany Germany (GER) 16 10 15 41
6 Australia Australia (AUS) 14 15 17 46
7 South Korea South Korea (KOR) 13 10 8 31
8 Japan Japan (JPN) 9 6 10 25
9 Italy Italy (ITA) 8 10 10 28
10 France France (FRA) 7 16 17 40
11 Ukraine Ukraine (UKR) 7 5 15 27
12 Netherlands Netherlands (NED) 7 5 4 16
13 Jamaica Jamaica (JAM) 6 3 2 11
14 Spain Spain (ESP) 5 10 3 18
15 Kenya Kenya (KEN) 5 5 4 14
16 Belarus Belarus (BLR) 4 5 10 19
17 Romania Romania (ROU) 4 1 3 8
18 Ethiopia Ethiopia (ETH) 4 1 2 7
19 Canada Canada (CAN) 3 9 6 18
20 Poland Poland (POL) 3 6 1 10
21 Hungary Hungary (HUN) 3 5 2 10
21 Norway Norway (NOR) 3 5 2 10
23 Brazil Brazil (BRA) 3 4 8 15
24 Czech Republic Czech Republic (CZE) 3 3 0 6
25 Slovakia Slovakia (SVK) 3 2 1 6
26 New Zealand New Zealand (NZL) 3 1 5 9
27 Georgia Georgia (GEO) 3 0 3 6
28 Cuba Cuba (CUB) 2 11 11 24
29 Kazakhstan Kazakhstan (KAZ) 2 4 7 13
30 Denmark Denmark (DEN) 2 2 3 7
31 Mongolia Mongolia (MGL) 2 2 0 4
31 Thailand Thailand (THA) 2 2 0 4
33 North Korea North Korea (PRK) 2 1 3 6
34 Argentina Argentina (ARG) 2 0 4 6
34 Switzerland Switzerland (SUI) 2 0 4 6
36 Mexico Mexico (MEX) 2 0 2 4
37 Turkey Turkey (TUR) 1 4 3 8
38 Zimbabwe Zimbabwe (ZIM) 1 3 0 4
39 Azerbaijan Azerbaijan (AZE) 1 2 4 7
40 Uzbekistan Uzbekistan (UZB) 1 2 3 6
41 Slovenia Slovenia (SLO) 1 2 2 5
42 Bulgaria Bulgaria (BUL) 1 1 3 5
42 Indonesia Indonesia (INA) 1 1 3 5
44 Finland Finland (FIN) 1 1 2 4
45 Latvia Latvia (LAT) 1 1 1 3
46 Belgium Belgium (BEL) 1 1 0 2
46 Dominican Republic Dominican Republic (DOM) 1 1 0 2
46 Estonia Estonia (EST) 1 1 0 2
46 Portugal Portugal (POR) 1 1 0 2
50 India India (IND) 1 0 2 3
51 Iran Iran (IRI) 1 0 1 2
52 Bahrain Bahrain (BRN) 1 0 0 1
52 Cameroon Cameroon (CMR) 1 0 0 1
52 Panama Panama (PAN) 1 0 0 1
52 Tunisia Tunisia (TUN) 1 0 0 1
56 Sweden Sweden (SWE) 0 4 1 5
57 Croatia Croatia (CRO) 0 2 3 5
57 Lithuania Lithuania (LTU) 0 2 3 5
59 Greece Greece (GRE) 0 2 2 4
60 Trinidad and Tobago Trinidad and Tobago (TRI) 0 2 0 2
61 Nigeria Nigeria (NGR) 0 1 3 4
62 Austria Austria (AUT) 0 1 2 3
62 Ireland Ireland (IRL) 0 1 2 3
62 Serbia Serbia (SRB) 0 1 2 3
65 Algeria Algeria (ALG) 0 1 1 2
65 Bahamas Bahamas (BAH) 0 1 1 2
65 Colombia Colombia (COL) 0 1 1 2
65 Kyrgyzstan Kyrgyzstan (KGZ) 0 1 1 2
65 Morocco Morocco (MAR) 0 1 1 2
65 Tajikistan Tajikistan (TJK) 0 1 1 2
71 Chile Chile (CHI) 0 1 0 1
71 Ecuador Ecuador (ECU) 0 1 0 1
71 Iceland Iceland (ISL) 0 1 0 1
71 Malaysia Malaysia (MAS) 0 1 0 1
71 South Africa South Africa (RSA) 0 1 0 1
71 Singapore Singapore (SIN) 0 1 0 1
71 Sudan Sudan (SUD) 0 1 0 1
71 Vietnam Vietnam (VIE) 0 1 0 1
79 Armenia Armenia (ARM) 0 0 6 6
80 Chinese Taipei Chinese Taipei (TPE) 0 0 4 4
81 Afghanistan Afghanistan (AFG) 0 0 1 1
81 Egypt Egypt (EGY) 0 0 1 1
81 Israel Israel (ISR) 0 0 1 1
81 Moldova Moldova (MDA) 0 0 1 1
81 Mauritius Mauritius (MRI) 0 0 1 1
81 Togo Togo (TOG) 0 0 1 1
81 Venezuela Venezuela (VEN) 0 0 1 1
Total 302 303 353 958
Dictionary for women
Argument (ar*gyou*ment) n. A discussion that occurs when you’re right, but he just hasn’t realized it yet.
Airhead (er*hed) n. What a woman intentionally becomes when pulled over by a policeman.
Bar-be-que (bar*bi*q) n. You bought the groceries, washed the lettuce, chopped the tomatoes, diced the onions, marinated the meat and cleaned everything up, but, he, “made the dinner.”
Blonde jokes (blond joks) n. Jokes that are short so men can understand them.
Cantaloupe (kant*e*lope) n. Gotta get married in a church.
Clothes dryer (kloze dri*yer) n. An appliance designed to eat socks.
Diet Soda (dy*it so*da) n. A drink you buy at a convenience store to go with a half pound bag of peanut M&Ms.
Eternity (e*ter*ni*tee) n. The last two minutes of a football game.
Exercise (ex*er*siz) v. To walk up and down a mall, occasionally resting to make a purchase.
Grocery List (grow*ser*ee list) n. What you spend half an hour writing, then forget to take with you to the store.
Hair Dresser (hare dres*er) n. Someone who is able to create a style you will never be able to duplicate again. See “Magician.”
Hardware Store (hard*war stor) n. Similar to a black hole in space-if he goes in, he isn’t coming out anytime soon.
Childbirth (child*brth) n. You get to go through 36 hours of contractions; he gets to hold your hand and say “focus,…breath…push…”
Lipstick (lip*stik) n. On your lips, coloring to enhance the beauty of your mouth. On his collar, coloring only a tramp would wear…!
Park (park) v./n. Before children, a verb meaning, “to go somewhere and neck.” After children, a noun meaning a place with a swing set and slide.
Patience (pa*shens) n. The most important ingredient for dating, marriage and children. See also “tranquilizers.”
Waterproof Mascara (wah*tr*pruf mas*kar*ah) n. Comes off if you cry, shower, or swim, but will not come off if you try to remove it.
Valentine’s Day (val*en*tinez dae) n. A day when you have dreams of a candlelight dinner, diamonds, and romance, but consider yourself lucky to get a card

2008 Olympics Opening Ceremony

A dancer performs during the Opening Ceremony for the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics at the National Stadium on August 8, 2008 in Beijing, China. (Jeff Gross/Getty Images)

2008 Olympics Opening Ceremony

Drummers perform during the Opening Ceremony for the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics at the National Stadium on August 8, 2008 in Beijing. (Adam Pretty/Getty Images)

2008 Olympics Opening Ceremony

An artist in a space suit performs during the Opening Ceremony for the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics at the National Stadium on August 8, 2008 in Beijing. (Vladimir Rys/Bongarts/Getty Images)

2008 Olympics Opening Ceremony

Fireworks explode over the National Stadium during the Opening Ceremony for the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games at the National Stadium on August 8 in Beijing. (Clive Rose/Getty Images)

2008 Olympics Opening Ceremony

Artists perform during the opening ceremony of the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games at the National Stadium, also known as the “Bird’s Nest”, on August 8, 2008. The three-hour show at Beijing’s iconic national stadium was set to see more than 15,000 performers showcase the nation’s ancient history and its rise as a modern power. (AFP PHOTO / Olivier Morin)

2008 Olympics Opening Ceremony

Percussionists take part in the opening ceremony of the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games in Beijing on August 8, 2008. (FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images)

2008 Olympics Opening Ceremony

Percussionists hit their Fou drums at the start of the opening ceremony of the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games in Beijing on August 8, 2008. (AFP PHOTO / Joe Klamar )

2008 Olympics Opening Ceremony

Percussionists with their Fou drums stand prior to the opening ceremony of the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games in Beijing on August 8, 2008. (AFP PHOTO / Jewel Samad)

2008 Olympics Opening Ceremony

Artists perform around an illuminated Globe during the Opening Ceremony for the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics at the National Stadium on August 8, 2008 in Beijing. (Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)

2008 Olympics Opening Ceremony

Artists perform during the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games opening ceremony on August 8, 2008 at the National Stadium in Beijing. Over 10,000 athletes from some 200 countries are going to compete in 38 differents disciplines during the event, between August 9 to 24. (WILLIAM WEST/AFP/Getty Images)

2008 Olympics Opening Ceremony

The Olympic rings are illuminated during the Opening Ceremony for the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics at the National Stadium on August 8, 2008 in Beijing. (Photo by Adam Pretty/Getty Images)

2008 Olympics Opening Ceremony

Artists underneath movable boxes perform during the Opening Ceremony for the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics at the National Stadium on August 8, 2008 in Beijing. (Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)

2008 Olympics Opening Ceremony

Martial arts dancers perform during the Opening Ceremony for the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics at the National Stadium on August 8, 2008 in Beijing. (Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)

2008 Olympics Opening Ceremony

Lighted dancers perform during the opening ceremony for the Beijing 2008 Olympics in Beijing, Friday, Aug. 8, 2008. (AP Photo/David Phillip)

2008 Olympics Opening Ceremony

Drummers perform during the Opening Ceremony for the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics at the National Stadium on August 8, 2008 in Beijing. (Vladimir Rys/Bongarts/Getty Images)

2008 Olympics Opening Ceremony

Artists perform during the Opening Ceremony for the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics at the National Stadium on August 8, 2008 in Beijing. (Mike Hewitt/Getty Images)

2008 Olympics Opening Ceremony

Performers cheer during the Opening Ceremony for the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics at the National Stadium on August 8, 2008 in Beijing. (Cameron Spencer/Getty Images)

2008 Olympics Opening Ceremony

Fireworks light the sky over the National Aquatics Center (L) and the National Stadium during the Opening Ceremony for the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics on August 8, 2008 in Beijing. (Lars Baron/Bongarts/Getty Images)

2008 Olympics Opening Ceremony

An artist performs, suspended by wires during the Opening Ceremony for the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics at the National Stadium on August 8, 2008 in Beijing. (Jeff Gross/Getty Images)

2008 Olympics Opening Ceremony

Drummers perform during the Opening Ceremony for the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics at the National Stadium on August 8, 2008 in Beijing. (Photo by Adam Pretty/Getty Images)

2008 Olympics Opening Ceremony

A musician performs during the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games opening ceremony on August 8, 2008 at the National Stadium in Beijing. (WILLIAM WEST/AFP/Getty Images)

2008 Olympics Opening Ceremony

Performers are pictured during the Opening Ceremony for the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics at the National Stadium on August 8, 2008 in Beijing. (Cameron Spencer/Getty Images)

2008 Olympics Opening Ceremony

A dancer is silhouetted as she performs during the Opening Ceremony for the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics at the National Stadium on August 8, 2008 in Beijing. (Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)

2008 Olympics Opening Ceremony

Children of migrant workers from outlying provinces look at themselves in the mirror as they use their hands to form the Olympic Rings after watching the TV live broadcast of the Olympic Games opening ceremony at their quarters August 8, 2008 on the outskirts of Beijing.


For a Better Life

1. Don’t talk when u r angry
2. Don’t take words seriously from the one who is angry

Do you want to see the world after Death?

Donate Eyes DONATE YOUR 'EYES'!!

Miles Crossed

  • 1,075,345 Miles
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